Tag Archives: Reynolds

Around The Compound (Taters-N-Onions)

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Hi everyone it’s John again, here to bore y’all with some horticulture.  A while back I shared some pictures from Feb. 23, 2014 and talked a bit about adding organic material to the garden soil.  The next day, Feb. 24th, we planted our potatoes for the year. Once again I took lots of pictures and would like to share.

Opening rows using a middle buster.

Opening rows using a middle buster.

I started potato planting by opening rows using a middle buster plow attached to the center of my cultivator implement bar behind our tractor.  As shown above, I started out by plowing one straight row and placing each additional row by simply running the wheels of my tractor  in the track left behind when I made the previous row (above left). This makes the row spacing just right for future cultivation and weeding between the rows.  To cultivate I remove the middle buster from the implement bar and attach smaller plows at the attach points shown in the picture (above right and center).   These smaller plows will contact the soil right behind my tractor tires as I cultivate.  This method of laying out my rows allows me to drive the tractor back through the same tire tracks left behind when I opened the rows to accomplish weeding without damaging my plants.

Cutting seed potatoes.

Cutting seed potatoes.

After opening the rows for planting we cut our seed potatoes.  The part of the potato that grows into a potato plant is the eye.  Each seed potato may have several eyes so this allows us to cut the seed potato, usually into several pieces, for planting.  We planted about sixty pounds of seed potatoes this year.

Placing seed potatoes in the row.

Placing seed potatoes in the row.

We placed the seed potatoes in the open row approximately six inches apart along the length of each row and at the bottom of the furrows. We use chicken manure for fertilizer but commercial fertilizer may be used at this point in the process.  Something like 13-13-13 works well, however, a soil test can tell you exactly what you need to use. Keep in mind that if your soil test says to use lime, never use lime on potatoes.  A calcium supplement can be sprayed on the plants later instead.

Covering the seed potatoes.

Covering the seed potatoes.

Here’s Justin Cole, my step son, covering my seed potatoes.  Pretty nice of him to help me out with all this huh?  He spent a good part of his day out in the cold helping me with this potato project.  Notice he is using his feet to close the dirt in over the seed potatoes.  If we would have had a large field of rows to close, we could have placed hilling disks or closing plows on our cultivator and closed the rows with the tractor.

Hay!

Hay!

Hay to protect our seeds from a hard freeze.

Hay to protect our seeds from a hard freeze.

I hauled a truck load of hay to spread directly over the rows to protect them in case of a hard freeze.  Its a good thing I did too!  Not long after we planted this potato crop we had about three inches of solid ice and freezing weather.  The hay cover provided enough insulation to keep my potatoes safe from the freeze.

Oh Boy!

Oh Boy!

The above picture was taken Saturday, April 12, 2014.  Looks like our potatoes are doing well!  I have already had to spray for potato bugs though.  A small brown bug that looks kind of like a ladybug will eat the potato plants and bring the crop to spoil if not kept in check.  When I see these bugs begin to appear I spray the plants with insecticide or treat them with 5% seven dust.

A pretty potato crop so far.

A pretty potato crop so far.

The next thing we planted was onions.  About two weeks after we planted potatoes and right after the last hard freeze, my brother-in-law John and I planted a couple of rows of onions.  We started out by opening some rows just like I did for the potatoes.

Onion sets.

Onion sets.

There are a couple of ways to start onions.  One way (shown above) is to plant onion bulbs.  Bulbs can be saved over the winter just like many flower bulbs or they can be purchased from a feed store or farm supply in late winter. Onion plants can also be used.  I have also heard of people starting them from seeds but I’ve never tried it, maybe a future project.

Placing onion bulbs.

Placing onion bulbs.

I place the onion bulbs in the row differently than I do potatoes.  I don’t put the onions all the way in the bottom of the furrow.  I put them about half way down the side  and alternate them from side to side as shown above. This makes one row almost like two close rows side by side.

John H. working!

John H. working!

Covering the onion bulbs.

Covering the onion bulbs.

Above is my brother-in-law John covering the onion bulbs.  He just covered them loosely with a couple of inches of soil.

Onions coming up!

Onions coming up!

The onions did come up and are growing well. We also have planted strawberries, lettuce, turnips, radishes, kale, and about a third of an acre of sunflowers.  I will keep you updated on our progress in the vegetable garden in future posts.

Look forward to Pigs-n-chickens in just a few days!

John

Throw Back Thursday – Sam Garrett and John Reynolds

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This is a photo of myself, John Reynolds and my grandfather, Sam Garrett, ca. 1975.

Sam Garrett and John Reynolds

Sam Garrett and John Reynolds

Wordless Wednesday – Bill and John Reynolds

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I probably could have used this photo for Throwback Thursday but I wanted to share it today even though I can’t go wordless. I love this old picture of my hubs, who is on the right, and his brother Bill, on the left.

Bill and John Reynolds

Bill and John Reynolds ca 1973

The Hubs still gets that look on his face sometimes!

Teasing.

Ok, not really but it’s usually after I say something dumb, followed up by him with a “Huh?”

Thriller Thursday – I Have an Unusual Attachment to the Dead!

Come save me Amy Allen!

If you don’t know who Amy Allen is, let me enlighten you.

The Dead Files

Amy is on a television show that I watch on a regular basis, The Dead Files, for the genealogy aspect of it.

Ok, ok, I admit I like to see what ghosts Amy encounters, they definitely add to the spooky aspect of the show.

You see, Amy is a medium.  She can talk to dead people!

What’s cool about this show is she goes to the property at night when no one else is around and does a walk through.  Meanwhile, her partner Steve Di Schiavi does all the leg work to see what history he can find out about the property, who lived there, what happened to them, what happened in the area around the property, etc. etc.  He keeps it secret from Amy, and at the end of the show they come together, and he presents his “evidence” and Amy relates her walk through, and usually she has sketches done by sketch artists.  They have never once differed on what they dig up. Her sketches usually look like a photo Steve has dug up.

You see, Steve is a former NYPD Detective.  He’s got mad skills!  Any genealogist or family historian can learn tips from Steve on digging up the past by watching this show. It shows him going all over town, doing research and interviewing people.

The other night I was watching the show, and Amy enters a property and she looks at the camera and says, “Whoah!!  Someone living here has an unusual attachment to the Dead!”

I immediately jumped out of my recliner and ran to the driveway to see if the film crew was out in my yard.  I was sorely disappointed.

I think if Amy had shown up to my house, she would have no doubt said the same thing about my property. The antiques that have been handed down to me that fill my home, the photos of ancestors lining my walls, the stacks of wills, probates, marriage licenses, and endless charts of this family line or that one, would all be a dead (excuse the pun) giveaway of my unusual attachment to the dead.

Do I want the dead lined up at the end of my bed as I sleep at night?  Well, goodness no! Not unless they want to tell me what FHW’s real name is and why he had a falling out with the family, or unless they want to tell me where John D. Parks came from and who his parents were.  Were my Robertson Ancestors of Cherokee blood?  Is Jane Holley Higginbotham a native american as family legend has told us?  Where is HWM??

I guess this show makes a very good case that everyone has a story waiting to be told. Apparently, even after they’re dead!  So they next time you see a chair slide across the room, don’t get scared!  Maybe one of your Ancestor’s is trying to tell you something!

As for me, I’ll keep on with my unusual attachment to the dead.  I still have ancestor’s to find.

Just think of the discoveries a genealogist could make if they had their own medium and detective!

Tombstone Tuesday – John Marion Key

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All day today I have been working on my husband’s genealogy, so I thought I would share the headstone of his great-grandfather, John Marion Key.  This is who my husband, John Marion Reynolds, was named after.

John Marion Key Headstone

John Marion Key Headstone

John Marion Key is buried in the Sardis Cemetery in Pine Grove, Dallas Co., Arkansas.

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