Franklin Pierce Burris

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Franklin Pierce Burris
b: 27 Oct 1852
d: 27 Dec 1911
Biography
Bethany Clipper, January 05, 1912

'A Good Man Gone' The Death of Franklin P. Burris

Franklin P. Burris was buried last Friday afternoon. The funeral was very largely attended by friends from all over Harrison County, as Mr. Burris was one of the most prominent farmers in the county.

He was born October 27, 1852, in Jackson County, Ohio. When five years of age he moved with his parents to Harrison County, Missouri, and settled on the farm upon which he resided until his death, December 27, 1911.

He was married to Emma C. Barlow, October 4, 1877. To this union were born George R., James Harvey, W. Clay, Frank Edwin, K. Clifford, Ruth, Joseph, Mary, Grace, Jhett, and Bruce, who survive him. Don died in infancy. He is also survived by his wife, Emma C. Burris, and his five sisters, Mrs. Weltha Mitchem of Tarkio, MO; Mrs. Nealy Howell, Davis City, Iowa; Mrs. Lydia Hughes, Oklahoma City, Okla; Mrs. Cora B. Weller, Katy, Texas; Mrs. Sue Rucker, Norman, Oklahoma.

Mr. Burris was a great man, viewed from every angle. His devotion to his family was beautiful. He lived for his home. His wife and children fairly worshipped him. He ruled his household well, not with a rod, for he never struck one of his children, but with that supreme power of love. Today, in the language of the scripture, his children rise up and call him blessed. They sincerely looked upon him as the truest and best man that God ever made. His life as a citizen was remarkable. In all his dealings he squared his actions by the Golden Rule. His word was as good as his bond. His name became a synonym for honor and honesty. No man stood higher in the estimation of his fellow citizens than did Frank P. Burris. He, with the uprightness of his life, was the embodiment of kindness. He trusted everyone, believed in everyone, because he expected others to do the square thing as he did. He was so open hearted that everyone with whom he came in contact admired him. He made friends everywhere, and it was the pride of his heart to win the good will of everyone. He made no enemies for himself, neither did he want anyone else to have an enemy. When he found there was a difference between two of his friends, he went out of his way to get them to understand each other and be friends. He was called "The Peacemaker". He informed one of his friends, a lawyer, that if he could have his way, there would never be any business for the legal fraternity.

As it is written, "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God." Mr. Burris was naturally a good citizen, but he was a Christian. While he never formally united with the church, never-the-less he was practically one of the most loyal members of the church at Mitchelville. He was always in this "little corner" as he termed it. Regular in attendance at the Sabbath school and church services, he was the main stay of the church, upholding it with his means and moral support. However, with all this, he stated to Brother Dotson, a neighbor, who is a clergyman, "I do not trust my salvation upon what good I have attempted to do, but in faith in Jesus Christ as my Savior. I am sorry to leave my dear wife and children, but am prepared to go to meet my Redeemer." With the poet he could sing:

"My God is reconciled;
His pardoning voice I hear;
He owns me for his child;
I can no longer fear."

Brother Burris was conscious until the last. He looked the future squarely in the face; made every material provision for the end with as much care and case as he did all matters of business. And then he left the priceless inheritance to each one of the family, his dying words, exhorting them not in material things, but spiritual matters. His great desire was that his stalwart sons and daughters should live the life of honor, of righteousness and purity. To one of his sons he presented his diamond ring, and as he placed it on his hand, said, "That is a clean hand, without the evidence of evil habit. I place this ring on your hand and ask that you receive this as a token of uprightness. Keep your hands and your life clean."

After the funeral sermon, Pastor Dotson of the Baptist church, made a very timely address, which was followed by Mr. Baldwin and Judge Ezra H. Frisby, who told of his honorable life; after which the I.O.O.F. lodge took charge of the services, consigning his body to the ground by their beautiful ceremony.
Facts
  • 27 Oct 1852 - Birth -
  • 27 Dec 1911 - Death -
Ancestors
   
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Franklin Pierce Burris
27 Oct 1852 - 27 Dec 1911
  
 
  
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Descendancy Chart
Franklin Pierce Burris b: 27 Oct 1852 d: 27 Dec 1911
Emma Cordelia Barlow b: 20 Sep 1857 d: 5 Sep 1935
James Harvey Burris b: 2 Sep 1881 d: 29 Feb 1976
Gertrude Roleke b: 7 Feb 1887 d: 29 Jul 1970
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
MFranklin Pierce Burris
Birth27 Oct 1852
Death27 Dec 1911
Marriageto Emma Cordelia Barlow
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Franklin Pierce Burris
Birth27 Oct 1852
Death27 Dec 1911
Marriageto Emma Cordelia Barlow
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (F) Emma Cordelia Barlow
Birth20 Sep 1857
Death5 Sep 1935
Marriageto Franklin Pierce Burris
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
MJames Harvey Burris
Birth2 Sep 1881
Death29 Feb 1976
Marriageto Gertrude Roleke
MGeorge R Burris
Birth
Death

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