Tombstone Tuesday – Audie and Mittie Lou (Harris) Brock

Posted on by 0 comment

This is the headstone of my great-uncle and aunt, Audie Brock and Mittie Lou (Harris) Brock.  They are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, in Texarkana, Arkansas.

Mittie Lou and Audie Brock Headstone

Mittie Lou and Audie Brock Headstone

Around The Compound – Chicken Manure – Building The Garden

Posted on by 6 comments

This is the first blog post ever for me.  I’m Susie’s husband John.  I hope y’all ain’t disappointed since I’m not the skilled blogger that you’ve grown accustomed to.  My wife Susie does a great job!! Susie and I took a few pictures on Feb. 23, 2014 of regular activities that go on around the compound, I believe them to be worthy of sharing…

Windy and cool, plowing the garden.

Windy and cool, plowing the garden.

It’s time to do some gardening any time!  Gardening and garden building goes on twelve months a year around here.  Adding organic material enriches the soil.  Year round tilling keeps me from having to fight weeds and grass in my garden all summer by keeping the weed roots and seeds exposed to the winter frost.

Plowing in the compost pile.

Plowing in the compost pile.

Compost is very important for building soil for gardening.  We save grass clippings, kitchen scraps, leftover corn stalks, anything organic in a compost pile beside the garden.  Above is a picture of me on our tractor spreading and tilling the compost into the soil. I’m also plowing in the remains of our winter turnip crop.  Mount Vernon soil is fairly poor and rocky but we have built our garden soil to be quite rich.

Great Garden Dirt!

Great Garden Dirt!

I find that adding hay to the soil and chopping it in with the tiller whenever I can get my hands on some is great.  It not only adds organic material to the soil, it also helps the soil hold moisture during the dry summer months.

Freshly Plowed Dirt.

Freshly Plowed Dirt.

Oops!  I haven’t mentioned anything about chicken manure yet!

Stop Thief! You're stealing my poop!!!

Stop Thief! You’re stealing my poop!!!

These two old roosters are investigating the theft of what is probably the most valuable additive that goes into my garden soil.  Chicken manure not only has stinky funk, it also has nitrogen which is essential to producing a great vegetable garden.

cleaning out the hen house!

Cleaning out the hen-house!

 

Chickens and hay.

Chickens and hay.

I had to include the photograph above!  It’s just a really good picture of some chickens and hay.

I got away with the poop!

I got away with the poop!

Ok, we’ve now added the poop to the garden.  The chickens didn’t like me taking it from the hen-house but I’m sure they’ll enjoy the fresh produce this summer.  Hope you weren’t too bored by the garden building blog. The very next day we planted our potatoes for the year.  I have lots of good photos of that too.  I’ll try to get them on here soon.

52 Ancestors – #11 Thomas Bullard

Posted on by 1 comment

I have decided to accept the challenge of Amy Johnson Crow over at No Story Too Small blog. Amy challenges us: 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks. I think this is an excellent challenge as I tend to focus on my brick walls, and this will force me to fan out in my tree and focus on other ancestors.

This is week eleven and my eleventh post in this challenge.  Thomas Bullard is my 5th great-grandfather, and an American Revolution Patriot.  I became a member of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution under Thomas Bullard.  This is Thomas’ signature taken from his pension application.

Thos Bullard signature

I made the video you will see below with information from his pension application and lots of research by myself, cousin Tony Davis, and documentation supplied from Billy Boykin.  If not for them, I wouldn’t have been able to do this.  Tony supplied the voice of Thomas and I narrated. Yes, I’m from Arkansas, and I apologize for sounding like such a hick!  :)

There is no better way for you to get to know my ancestor than this video so without further ado, please met my 5th great-grandfather, Thomas Bullard.

I’ve been reluctant to share this video before now because there are still a couple of pictures I used in this video that I have had trouble finding the original owner of. The photos were just used on so many websites, it was impossible to find the owner. So if I have used your photo without your permission, it wasn’t from a lack of trying to find you I promise. Please contact me and I will make it right immediately.

I hope you enjoyed the story of Thomas Bullard and if you would like to put something similar together for your patriot ancestor, here are a few websites I used to find information about my patriot and/or information about battles, geography and the way of life from the time period.

  • Maps from 1779 available at Wikimedia Commons: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
  • Transcripts of Pension Applications: http://revwarapps.org/index.htm
  • North Carolina Digital Archives for family records: http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/digital/ncfamilyrecords/
  • Original Pension Applications, pay ledger and service ledger: www.fold3.com
  • DAR Headquarters for further documentation regarding the Patriot and descendants, in the Patriot’s file available for 25 cents a page, or you can order a copy from their website at www.DAR.org
  • Colonial Williamsburg has a wonderful website, and that is where I downloaded the song for the video – Touch Me Lightly. They also have other sound clips such as people from the time period telling their thoughts on the war, slave songs, Patrick Henry’s speech “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death”, and a reading of the Declaration of Independence. I also bought some of the pictures for the video from their website. www.history.org
  • http://swampfoxbrigade.blogspot.com/ has quite a bit of information on the Revolutionary War for the states of South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia.
  • http://flintlockandtomahawk.blogspot.com/ has quite a bit of information on culture, art, movie clips and general information from the time period.
  • http://www.google.com/earth/index.html Awesome application for charting the path of an ancestor, you can add place marks, photos, videos and they have really cool map overlays from many different time periods.
  • Tons of information here for Duplin Co., North Carolina: http://www.usgwarchives.net/nc/duplin.htm
  • Pictures in chronological order of the American Revolutionary War: http://www.archives.gov/research/military/american-revolution/pictures/index.html#central

 

This is how I descend from Thomas:

From Thomas Bullard to Me

Category: 52 Ancestors | Tags: ,

Throw Back Thursday – Harris Siblings

Posted on by 0 comment

I love this photo of my grandmother, Edna, with her siblings.

Left to Right: JD Harris, Edna (Harris) Higginbotham, Maudie (Harris) Chapman, Magdalene (Harris) Griffin, James Harris, Oscar Harris and Mittie Lou (Harris) Brock.

Harris Siblings

Harris Siblings

52 Ancestors – #10 Nancy (Allen) Triggs

Posted on by 1 comment

I have decided to accept the challenge of Amy Johnson Crow over at No Story Too Small blog. Amy challenges us: 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks. I think this is an excellent challenge as I tend to focus on my brick walls, and this will force me to fan out in my tree and focus on other ancestors.

Nancy (Allen) Triggs is my 3rd great-grandmother. This is week ten, and my tenth post in the challenge.

I don’t have a photo of Nancy.  I don’t have any personal stories of Nancy, but I have put together pieces of her life from documents left, and knowing the history for the time period, I have a pretty good idea of what her life must have been like.

Her husband, and my 3rd great-grandfather, Rev. John James Triggs, left a very well documented bible.

In this bible, he lists her birth.

Nancy Allen birth from Triggs Bible

Nancy Allen birth from Triggs Bible

It reads: “Nancy Allen was born in Columbia Cty Geo. Sep, 21, 1821. She was the daughter of Francis T Allen and Jane Allen. Thank you for this information I would have probably never found any where else.

He also documented their marriage:

John and Nancy Triggs Marriage Record in Triggs Bible

John and Nancy Triggs Marriage Record in Triggs Bible

It reads: “John J. Triggs and Nancy Allen were married in Columbia County by Rev. Wm H. Evans, September 16, 1845.”

I confirmed this date by finding the marriage record in Columbia County.

John J Triggs to Nancy Allen Marriage Records

John J Triggs to Nancy Allen Marriage Records

I found Rev. Triggs and wife Nancy leaving in Waynesboro, Burke Co., Georgia at the time of the 1850 Census. I know from research that Rev. Triggs was not land poor at all. He had homesteaded, and also been granted land for his service during the war of 1812. So, when it says that he had real estate worth $3,000 on the 1850 census, I was not surprised. That would have been about $81,570 in 2012 according to an inflation calculator. They are shown as living with my 2nd great-grandmother, Jane Matilda (Triggs) Parks, and my great grand-uncle, Francis A Triggs.

1850 Census Triggs Family

1850 Census Triggs Family

I know from the bible that she had three children with Rev. Triggs.

  • Jane Matilda Triggs Parks (1845 – 1913)
  • Francis Allen Triggs (1850 – 1876)
  • George Persons Triggs (1853 – 1855)

 

Now, between the 1850 census and the 1860 census, Rev. Triggs died on the 20th of December 1856. This is a transcription of the part of his will that pertains to Nancy.

Item fourth – The rest of my property consisting of lots of land in the twenty third district of originally Lee now Stewart County ____ number one hundred and eighteen (118) and one hundred and thirty nine (139) also two acres from one hundred (107) adjoining the aforesaid lot one hundred eighteen also my negro man Tom my negro man Toney, my negro boy Ned – my negro woman Hagas, Lucy, Leah and her child Cranford and Frances, together with any children that may hereafter be born of any of the aforesaid negro women – also my horses, mules, cattle and hogs: – Also the household and kitchen furniture and plantation tools: – and everything that is mine not previously disposed of whatever or whereas it is shall belong to my dear wife Nancy and her two children, ___ Jane Matilda and Francis Allen and any other child or children that may hereafter be born to me – the above property to be kept together for the maintenance of my wife and children and for the education of the children, until my wife or one of the children marry or one of the children arrives at the age of twenty one years – then if required a division shall be made as nearly equal as possible, between my wife and the children – the party requiring the division shall receive his or her part – the rest of the property shall be kept together for the maintenance and education of the next until another division is required or contemplated above – provided always that the division mentioned above shall not be so continued or to divide the land so long as my wife lives and remains a widow.

So, this explains why on the 1860 census she is living in Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia by herself with her two children, and an overseer and his son.

1860 Census Triggs Family

1860 Census Triggs Family

Who knows what she had to go through while taking care of all that, with the war between the states going on. She had $4,000 worth of real estate property and $7,300 worth of personal property. I have no way of knowing, but I bet men were lined up wanting to marry her and take over her plantation, and Rev. Triggs took care of that in the will. Had she remarried, it would have gone to her children. She was after all only 38 years old in 1860.  I imagine he assumed she would remarry and his son would come of age and take over.

She didn’t have long to think about any of this. She died of Paralysis on September 6, 1863 according to the Triggs Bible.

Nancy Triggs death in Triggs Bible

Nancy Triggs death in Triggs Bible

Her estate was divided up between my 2nd great-grandmother, Jane Parks, and my great-grand uncle Francis Triggs. He died in 1876 and I don’t know what became of anything after his death.

I don’t know where Nancy is buried, who knows what happened with the war going on, but I hope to maybe find this out if I can ever make a research trip to Georgia!

Thank you to cousin Robert Mann, for sharing the bible records with me!

This is how I descend from Nancy.

Nancy Allen to Susie

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Bulk Email Sender