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MONDAY’S MAN: ALBERT WALDEN EASON, THE FINAL CHAPTER

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Albert W Eason, Shreveport

In December my blog shared information I had retrieved from the diary of Albert Walden Eason.  Since that time I have been able to gather more records and stories about him.  Sadly I say, some years are still missing, but as a genealogy hound, there is sure to be another trail to sniff out.

Being the writer he was, he made note of his day to day activities as well as his financial affairs in his diary.  He bought stock regularly, banked at the Bloomburg State Bank and was generous in giving to his mother and brothers.  He studied Commercial Partnership Calculations though correspondence courses and scored a 98% on his test. On one trip to New York City, he stopped at the Treasury Building on Wall Street where a statue of George Washington took the oath of the first President of the United States.  His written comment was, “The view of the site was interesting and it was not without a feeling of awe that I realized I was standing upon historical ground directly connected with the history of our great United States.” I make mention of this as it will come into play in his investments in the coming years.

Although the diaries I was able to read,  covered only the years from 1924-1926, I have been able to learn from the 1930 census he was stationed at the Navy Shipyard in Charleston, South Carolina.  He was a pharmacist mate and had been married for one year.

Albert married Anna Tate of New York; the daughter of Samuel Tate and Lena Éclair. Samuel emigrated from Ireland   to New York in 1879; became a naturalized citizen in 1883; married Lena, a native of New York; and was a carpenter/home builder.

Of Albert and Anna’s union there were two children born, namely Albert Jr. and Janet. In this article located on genealogybank.com published in the San Diego, California Evening Tribune on April 23, 1933 the announcement is made of the birth of his son.

Albert Eason, Jr.'s birth

After retiring from the Navy Albert moved to Dallas Texas where he worked as a civil employee of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. The following article was located on genealogybank.com. The publication was June 16, 1956 in the Dallas Morning News.

Albert Eason service, corps of engineers

Anna passed away February 8, 1971 in Dallas Texas. Her obit was published the following day in the Dallas Morning News.

Anna Tate Eason Obit

Prior to meeting and marrying Anna, Albert wrote in his diaries of his second cousin, Lettie Beatrice Hemperley and his fondness for her.

Beatrice Hemperley Tolleson Crain Eason downtown Shreveport

These are some excerpts:

Albert speaks of Bea 1

Albert speaks of Bea 2

During Anna’s lifetime and particularly after Beatrice’s husband, Ernest Crain, died, Albert and Anna visited Beatrice. Following Anna’s death, Albert and Beatrice grew closer and married on July 10, 1972 in Shreveport, Louisiana where Beatrice lived. I remember being at my father-in-law’s (John Raymond Hemperley) home shortly after their marriage when they came for a visit. I found him to be warm, personable, and outgoing.

Beatrice was a gregarious, outgoing, fun lady and, to me, was an independently strong woman. She worked in Shreveport many years and rode the trolley to work. Some of the places where she worked were: Millers’s Drug, Barquette Restaurant, Theo’s Restaurant, and her favorite place, Strawn’s. She had also worked at the shell plant during the war. Beatrice had an adopted daughter from her first marriage, Ruby Tolleson and she and her 2nd husband, Ernest Crain were parents to Dorothy and Ernest Jr.

Beatrice and Albert’s marriage was unusual in that they never lived in the same house. Beatrice would not allow him to move in and so when the house next door came up for sale, Albert bought it and established his household where he continued his diary writings until the day he died.

Bea and Albert dressed up

Beatrice passed away on July 27, 1988 and is buried by husband, Ernest Crain, Sr., in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Albert continued his residence in Shreveport until his death on November 22, 1988. He was returning from a month long to trip to Connecticut to visit friends and died in flight over Georgia.Special gifts to loved ones are listed in his will filed in Caddo Parish.

Albert Eason Will

Remember earlier how I told you about his investments? This inventory of stocks is from Albert’s succession.

Albert's stocks

A total of 4,250 shares! And he also had an annuity and real estate. I would say through his business acumen, good planning and frugal ways he was financially comfortable at the time of his death.

Albert was laid to rest along his wife Anna at Restland Memorial Park in Dallas, Texas.

Category: Genealogy, Monday's Man | Tags: , ,

THROW BACK THURSDAY: MAUDE GLADYS HEMPERLEY PETTIT

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Maude Gladys Hemperley, daughter of Jefferson Beauregard Hemperley and Louvenia Virginia Sheppard, was born in Miller County, Arkansas on January 5, 1896.  There were thirteen children in the family.  As you can see by this Ripley’s Believe It Or Not article, which appeared in the Shreveport Times on October 3, 1953, she was a little different than her siblings! It makes me wonder what color her parents’ eyes were.

Maude Hemperly

The Bus

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Over the past month or so I have attended two meetings regarding the importance of writing our family stories.  The first was hosted by GENCOM Genealogical Society at the Broadmoor Branch Library in Shreveport.  Gary Calligas, publisher of The Best of Times magazine as well as being the host of a radio program by the same name, was the guest spokesman. Mr. Calligas stressed the importance of interviewing older relatives and writing their stories as well as your own.

A few days later I met with another group of ladies interested in writing at the home of Karen Logan of Gilliam.  Our inspiration came from Harriet Daggert, a retired school teacher, who has begun a number of these groups in our area. After reading stories written by a group she had initiated at a retirement home she then challenged our group, of about twelve people, to meet again in two weeks with a story of our high school years.  Below is my submission regarding years at North Caddo High School in Vivian, Louisiana.

The Bus

The big yellow school bus pulled up in front of me, the door opened and there sat Mr. Self, the driver, inviting me to climb aboard.  Never in my life had I ridden a school bus! I thought this to be so degrading but soon came to the realization that many of the giggling kids aboard had never known another way of getting to school.  They had never known having their parent drop them off or being able to walk next door to high school.  Perhaps riding the bus might not be as bad as when, at a different school, our yard abutted the school’s.  That was where my younger sisters set up a booth, much like a lemonade stand, where they tried to sell castoff dried locust shells to passing students. Talk about being embarrassed!

I was truly on my own that January morning as Mother was twenty-five miles away enrolling those two bug selling brat sisters in their school.  I found most of the riders on the bus were friendly and began asking where I was from, what grade I was in and my name.  My name!!!  Did I have to tell them???  Okay, so it’s Raby but I go by my nickname, Kookie, so please call me that.  There were the usual snickers as the boys promptly called me Rabies!  No, it’s not Roby, Ruby, Robbie, nor Rabby.  It’s Raby (Ray-B) but just call me Kookie.

Arriving at the campus of North Caddo High I was speechless!  It was huge!  There were rows and rows of the big yellow buses backed up in the drop off zone waiting to off load kids.  I had never seen that many teenagers hurriedly scampering off to the different “wings” trying to beat the bell before first class.  After all, in my three previous high schools, the total enrollment was smaller than the freshman class here.

 I think it was Mr. Self that directed me to the Principal’s office to enroll.  My curriculum would change that day as North Caddo didn’t teach Spanish but did Latin.  No way!  I was only taking Spanish because Mother wanted me to and I wanted no part of Latin.  Home Economics had already finished sewing so I would learn to cook; but wait; I had already done that in my last school but I had never sewn.  North Caddo didn’t have a girls’ basketball team therefore basketball would only be played in Phys Ed. I was so disappointed. Algebra was beyond the point that I had studied and I felt sure I would never catch up much less make a passing grade.

My biggest fear that day was learning where A, B, and C wings were located.  I didn’t even care where the cafeteria was as my stomach was in turmoil.  And lockers with combinations?  I just knew I would never master that in time to get the appropriate book or make it all the way to a class in a totally different wing before the tardy bell rang.  I had nightmares about wings, lockers and bells the remainder of the year however I managed to finish the year without too many glitches or a trip to the Principal’s office.

By my junior and seniors years, things were much better.  I had made friends and could find my way around campus, beat the bell, and open my locker.   My Phys Ed teacher sponsored a girls’ basketball team at the YWCA in Shreveport and invited me to play.  Luckily I made the Shreveport Y’s All Star Team.  I didn’t place in calendar girl tryouts as I had what mother referred to as “knocked knees”.   It was about that time that an association with Mrs. Amy Gleason began.  She was beautiful inside and out as well as a true Southern lady.   Mrs. Amy taught journalism and English which were my two favorite subjects. In class we wrote the school’s newspaper, the Southern Accent, as well as a skit we preformed at the talent contest about a group of riders on a bus.  My friend and I played the parts of two young girls desperately needing to get off the bus in order to find a restroom. While we didn’t win a prize for our performance, we did get lots of laughs.

During my last year at North Caddo I got a roll in the senior play playing the part of a newlywed. In the anxiety and excitement of performing on stage before a live audience I skipped two pages of the dialogue!  Luckily my “husband” picked it up from that point and the audience never knew.

  By this time riding the bus was no longer denigrating but something I looked forward to.  You see, there was this tall skinny boy with dark hair and beautiful blue eyes who got on in Gilliam.  Now when Mr. Self opened the door, I hurriedly entered and found him seated at the rear of the bus.  He and I became best friends first, dated and following high school, married.

Would you believe my trip to our first home was made on a big Greyhound bus? Only this time Mr. Self wasn’t the driver.  This time upon arriving at my destination there was that same handsome young man, dressed in Air Force blues, waiting to guide me through the bells, wings and the combinations of our lives.

One never knows when the bus door opens and you step in just what lies ahead.

Category: Sentimental Sunday, Stories | Tags:

ROAD TRIP: HENRY FINCHER EASON, SR: THE REST OF THE STORY

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Henry Fincher Eason

I will never cease to be amazed by the research information, documents, and contacts to be found through internet!  It is truly mindboggling that after extensive research in libraries and courthouses, traipsing through graveyards, genealogy websites, searching high and low, sometimes the “rest of the story” is just a click away.  Such was the case when on October 1st I posted “Road Trip: Henry Fincher Eason”, which is also shared on Facebook.  A long time friend shared that blog with a friend of hers, Lyndal Lane Eason.

Through email, Lane contacted me on Our Families Untold Stories, and told me his grandfather was the brother of Fincher!  He also told me his family held the diary of another uncle, Albert Eason, which would enlighten me as to what lead up to Fincher taking his life.   After several emails and phone calls it was time for another road trip!

It wasn’t long before my genealogy side-kick, Cheri Payton Atkins, and I were in the road to Three States, near Atlanta, Texas, to visit with Lane and his brother, William Winston Eason.  My mind was racing as I drove along wondering of the secrets about to be unveiled; how I would be greeted by the Eason brothers; and would it be possible to copy parts of the diary. All I can say is how incredibly warm and sharing these two men are!

As we sat getting to know each other and chatting about my husband’s connection to the Easons, three diaries written by Uncle Albert were lying before me on Lane’s desk.

Alberts diaries stacked

I could hardly wait until I had them in my hands. The diaries, all written in books issued by the U. S. Navy, contained daily entries about Albert’s naval career, letters from home, and relationships he had with family members. Scattered among the diaries were faded newspaper articles as well as memories recorded by Albert. I couldn’t possibly read it all within the timeframe I had that day. Graciously, Lane and Albert generously loaned them to me to take home to read and copy.

Almost as soon as I arrived home it began raining and so I settled in for the weekend as it would take a while to read all the books. Two contained close to 200 pages and the larger one 400. It was fascinating and like a good novel, I could not put them down!

The newspaper clippings below do not tell which newspapers they appeared nor some of the dates published. Some were entered into Albert’s diary with the dates of when he received them.

Fincher Eason Tax Collector Ends His Life 11-20-1924

Fincher Eason Tax Collector Ends His Life 11-20-1924 continued

In this article you learn that he took his life by ingesting carbolic acid in his Court House office. It also states that he wrote letters grammatically correct, in his perfect penmanship and punctuation precisely accentuated, on the backs of prints of himself that he had planned on using to run for a state office. (Lane and Winston tell me he aspired to become Governor of Arkansas.) Letters addressed to his children and former wife were sealed. He left his wishes for the distribution of his property and speaks of his failing health, as well as accusations against certain individuals.

Fincher Eason Thousands Attend Funeral 12-8-1924

In this article it addresses those in attendance at his funeral, namely the Knights of Templar who conducted the grave services and about seventy-five (75) robed and masked Ku Klux Klansmen! It further states his was said to have been one of the high officials of the Klan. It seems as if he was so highly esteemed that despite his short comings, was regarded as a man with charitable heart and mind who was betrayed by some within his circles.

Before long Sheriff Barber filed claims against Fincher’s estate:

Sheriff files Claims Agains Eason Estate 6-13-1925

Walter S. Harris, administrator of the Estate brings suit to collect tax:

Administrator of Eason Estate Sue to Collect Tax 2-9-1925

And finally, the Bondsmen pay taxes to Arkansas:

 

Bondsmen for Fincher to Pay Arkansas 10-10-1925

Bondsmen for Fincher Pay State 43,000 1-10-1925

While there is much family speculation as to whom Fincher’s wife had an affair with, there is no name mentioned in Albert’s diary, therefore, I cannot document it. What I do know is that his children were taken from his wife at the time of divorce, remained in his custody until his suicide and then were awarded to his sister to rear.

Fincher wrote of his health in the letters he wrote during his last moments, however those letters are sealed and I have been unable to locate a death certificate. I suppose I will never know of his physical condition.

As I have stated in the previous post Fincher was a leader in his community having been a teacher, principal and superintendent. He was Chairmen of the Registration Board in Miller County during WWI; enlisted as a private and became a Captain. He served as Tax Collector and Clerk of Court of Miller County; held memberships in the Mystic Shrine, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and was a Baptist. Fincher was a high profile man in Miller County.

Perhaps he was overly ambitious; perhaps politics were his downfall. Perhaps there are things better off unknown. However what is known is that he was admired and forgiven for any wrong doings by the citizens of Miller County, Arkansas as demonstrated by the thousands in attendance at his funeral.

 

Category: Genealogy, Road Trips | Tags: ,

ROAD TRIP: HENRY FINCHER EASON

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It was a beautiful late September day last Thursday when friend Cheri Atkins and I drove to Texarkana, Arkansas on a quick road trip to do some research at the Miller County Court House. Her goal was for Dial and Collins documents, and I would be searching for Martins and Hemperleys.

As we drove we talked about late blooming summer flowers and how it was difficult it was to recognize some parts of Highway 71 since I-49 construction had changed the scenery. We passed round bales of hay in fields, a pasture filled with a herd of buffalo, churches and graveyards. There was some construction and we even passed a group of prisoners picking up trash along the roadway.  Cheri, who has a vivid imagination, commented on how she thought it would be easy for one of those convicts to escape.  A short time later we passed a police vehicle heading South flying down the road with lights flashing soon to be followed by five more patrol cars.

Arriving at our destination of 400 Laurel Street, there it stood…… the Court House. My imagination ran rampant about the discoveries we were about to make. I could already smell the old books filled with Our Families Untold Stories.

The Court House is located in older section of town filled with homes of the same era and nearby beautiful churches. This was not the original Court House which initially served both Texas and Arkansas, but the one finished in the late 1930s to serve only Miller County, Arkansas.

Miller County Court House

Once inside we must have looked as if we were strangers to its halls as a man I recognized from the Court House’s website as County Judge Larry E. Burgess offered assistance by directing us to the Clerk of Court’s office. I can only sing the praises of those who work there as they were friendly, courteous and only too eager to answer our questions or offer assistance.

The search was on! Cheri and I both were able to obtain documents pertaining to marriage licenses, preacher certificates, deeds and other priceless pieces of our families’ history.  Then it dawned on me that I was standing not only among history of Miller County but the history of one Henry Fincher Eason, former Clerk of Court and Tax Collector of Miller County AND his mother was a Hemperley!

Henry Fletcher Eason-1

(Photo owned by Susie Higginbotham Reynolds)

Fincher Eason (son of Seaborn Sidney) was one of fifteen children born to his father and mother, Luella Hemperley (daughter of Dr. Edward Thomas Hemperley, great grandfather of my husband). His family lived in Sulphur Township on his father’s farm.

He attended college at Louisiana State Normal School and at the age of twenty-two began a career in education. He served as teacher, principal and superintendent. Below is a photo of College Hill Ward School in Texarkana where he was a principal.

Fincher Eason, College Hill School

On December 23, 1908 he married Miss Ollie Minnie Walton and from this union there were six children born, two of which died in infancy.

In 1916 he became Miller County Clerk of Court and served for two terms before becoming Tax Collector in 1920. The 1920 Census shows him living at 414 Hickory Street with his wife and four children: Fincher, Jr. age 9, Sidney S. age 6, William Boyd, age 5 and Evelyn who is 1 year of age. On November 20, 1923 Fincher and Ollie divorced and he retained sole custody of the children.

During WWI he served as Chairman of the registration board; enlisted as a private and reached the rank of Captain.

 

 

Recently while looking over notes I had made while interviewing a Hemperley relative thirty years ago, I had jotted down “committed suicide” by his name. It was time to revisit Fincher and locate any information I could find regarding how he died. Below are a couple of articles I found on www.genealogybank.com relating to his death.

Fincher Eason found deadFincher Eason FuneralFincher Eason , Tax office closed

Why, I thought? Why would a man who was a pillar in the community commit suicide?  He had to be well thought of as there were 2,000 people that attended his funeral and 4,000-5,000 at the gravesite!  This man was a 32nd degree Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine, served as senior deacon of the lodge, Member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythia, Woodmen of the World and Baptist Church. I had to know more and so I enlisted the help of one of the clerks to locate the probate records from his estate. Surely his will, one of the letters he had written, or the “To The People of Miller County” mentioned in the newspaper article about him being found dead would give me some insight.

His will was not in the Probate Records. None of the letters were.  Nor was the “To the People of Miller County”.  Nothing to give me a hint or understanding of his taking his life.  However, what I did locate was a list of his debts, which amounted to $83,000.  In 1923 that had to be comparable to millions today!

Fincher Eason, Total Debts

As you can see from this document, the administrator of his estate asks the Court to allow 35% payment of his debts or $29,050.

Did he commit suicide because of his divorce; his being the sole parent raising four children; ill health; or the amount of debt he owed? I suppose I will never know!

What I did learn was that the two ounces of poison he took changed the lives of his children forever. Fincher’s sister, Ida Hughes, petitioned the Court for custody of the children as set out by Fincher in his will.

Fincher Eason's Children Guardianship

The children’s mother sued for custody of two of the four children and according to the article below, the judge in the case awarded them to Fincher’s sister, Mrs. Ida Hughes of Bright Star, per his handwritten wishes.

Custody of Henry Fincher Eason's Children

 

 

 

 

One week later Arkansas State Police and other law enforcement officers are still looking for the escapee.

One week later I am still looking for more information on another escaped man, namely  Henry Fincher Eason!

 

 

 

 

Throwback Thursday: A Day on the Cossatot

Don Hemperley and Tommy Burge

Don Hemperley and Tommy Burge after a morning of fly fishing on the Cossatot River near Gilham, Arkansas.

VIRGOS: HERE’S OUR SIGN!

According to astrology, Virgo, the sixth sign of the Zodiac, runs from August 23 through September 22 (although some say the cusp day is the 23).  It is the only sign represented by a woman.  Virgos typically are reliable, practical, meticulous and do well in vocations of service, such as doctors, nurses, teachers, bookkeepers.  They are also creative and sensitive.  Do I, as a Virgo, believe all of this?  I don’t put a lot of credence in it however I do read my horoscope daily!

In my family tree of most recent relatives, I have sixteen Virgos not counting myself.  My grandmother was one.  One aunt, one uncle, one daughter, one daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, one grandson, one great grandson, one niece and her husband, one nephew, one nephew’s wife, two great nephews, and one great niece are all Virgos. Whew!  Not to worry only four are the subjects of this post.

Granddaughter Emerson Avery Hemperley (Emy) was born September 3, 1992 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Steve and Andrea Tanet Hemperley.  As a child she took ballet but soon diverted her competitive spirit to sports playing tee ball and soccer.

Emy Hemperley

 

Emy, 1996

The photo above shows her determination while playing at an arcade in Celebration Station in New Orleans in 1996.

Emy began school in Mandeville, Louisiana; graduated from Sacred Heart Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Following graduation she traveled to Paris, France and has visited other large cities including New York City.   She attended Ole Miss, missed New Orleans, returned and is currently enrolled at the University of New Orleans.  She and her family enjoy spending time at their camp in Monterey, Louisiana however Emy is truly a New Orleans girl to the core!  She loves the city and all it has to offer; Mardi Gras, clubs, good food, family and friends.

Emy at Mardi Gras

Zachery Tucker Hemperley, Emy’s brother, was born September 6, 1994 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Tucker first attended school in Mandeville, Louisiana and graduated from Jesuit High School in New Orleans.  While living in Mandeville, he played tee ball and loved skate boarding.

Tucker Hemperley

Tucker likes to hunt and fish and can often be found at the family retreat entertaining friends.

Tucker's First Deer

Tucker’s first deer was taken in Monterey, Concordia Parish, Louisiana.  The following photo was made while fishing in Mexico.

Tucker fishing in Mexico

Tucker is in his second year at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge where he pledged K A.  Below is a photo of Tucker and Southern Belle, Gabby Ray at the fraternity’s celebration of the Old South.

 

Tucker and Gabby

Nine days following Emy’s birth, granddaughter Lauren Elise Brown was born in Hobbs, New Mexico on September 12, 1992 to Scott and Kelly Hemperley Brown.

Lauren was active in scouting beginning at the age of four.  Too young for the Daisys, she attended meetings where he mother was scout leader.

Lauren's first apron

She went on to become a Brownie, Girl Scout, and earned the Silver Star award which is the equivalent to the BSA Eagle Scout.

Lauren Elise Brown

She attended Herndon Magnet School in Gilliam, Louisiana and graduated from Caddo Magnet High School in Shreveport. Lauren enjoys Renaissance Festivals, Dr. Who, fly fishing and camping with family. They have traveled as far West as Colorado, North to South Dakota, and East to Florida and Washington, D. C. Lauren attended University of Louisiana Monroe and Louisiana Technical College in Shreveport where she studied the culinary arts. She is currently employed at a law firm in Shreveport.

the Dawsons

Lauren married Christopher Wayne Dawson and on August 23, 2014 gave birth to another Virgo, a son, Benjamin Rhys Dawson in Shreveport, Louisiana. Ben enjoys being fed, napping, and being spoiled by everyone.

Benjamin Rhys Dawson

And the final featured Virgo is my daughter, Kelly Anne Hemperley Brown. Kelly was born on September 21, 1963 in Texarkana, Arkansas. She was a mischievous child who was always into something. The joke in our family was that had she been born prior her brother, he would never have been born! There was always impishness in her eyes as she was about to get into something. However, to this day when she hears me call out “Kelly Anna”, she knows she’s in deep trouble! Give her a challenge and she will eagerly accept it.

Kelly Anne Hemperley

Kelly was educated in public schools in Vivian, Louisiana graduating from North Caddo High where she was a member of the Louisiana All Star Marching Band and the winner of the I Dare You award at graduation. She attended Louisiana State University-Shreveport for a short while before enrolling in business school. Prior to her graduation she was hired by the Caddo Parish Police Jury as personal secretary to the administrator; a position she held for seven years before moving to Hobbs, New Mexico. While employed at the Police Jury it changed to a Commission and a resolution was written into the Commission’s minutes, which was entered into Caddo Parish’s history, for her dedication and work during the transition.

Resolution of Appreciation for Kelly Hemperley Brown in Caddo Parish

 

In New Mexico she was employed by the City of Hobbs where she received special recognition as employee of the month.

Kelly Hemperley Brown, Hobbs, New Mexico

In 1993 her family moved back to Caddo Parish and she returned to work for Caddo Parish; this time in the District Attorney’s office in the drug division. Since then she has been responsible for the training of all secretaries in the District Attorney’s office and most recently moved to the position of secretary for the Appellate Court.

20140726_174724

Kelly’s dedication to helping others, lead her to become a Girl Scout leader for many years; church secretary; church youth leader; and exercise instructor. However I think she would say her most important job today is that of being wife, mother and grandmother. A job she does well!

Now that you have allowed me to give you a little insight to my favorite Virgos, I would also like to wish the others who share the sign a Happy Birthday. They are Andrea Tanet Hemperley, Marty Stanley Roberts and husband Jimmy, Damon Goodwin, Melissa Slaughter Goodwin, David Stanley, Greg Stanley, and Amanda Roberts Mather!

 

 

Throw Back Thursday: Jesse and Teeny’s Kids

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Jesses Kids Janet and Johnny

Janet Lynn Hemperley Stanley and Johnny Ray Hemperley, children of Jesse Raymond and Earnestine “Teeny” Jane Parker Hemperley.

ROAD TRIP: NEW ORLEANS IN JULY, PART III, DAT’S DA PLACE!

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Tourists visit New Orleans to eat, drink and be merry.  On every corner there’s a place to “do dat”.  While tourists flock to the world famous restaurants of New Orleans, locals have their favorite neighborhood haunts. That is not to say they don’t frequent the more renowned ones, they do; however New Orleans is about neighborhoods and a sense of belonging.  Mostly we ate in the Garden District area.   Some restaurants there are expensive; some are funky and fun but all are loud!  Since I love to eat, the subject of Part III of New Orleans in July will be a few places my son Steve Hemperley’s family and I ate on my recent visit.

Early Saturday afternoon when we arrived, everyone else had already eaten or were running errands so Steve took me to GG’s Dine-O-Rama located at 3100 Magazine Street.  GG’s specializes in homemade, fresh and unique recipes made from scratch.  They offer fine dining or a casual menu with your choice of seating; inside or out.  He and I opted to dine on the sidewalk cooled by a mister fan and watch the activity along Magazine Street.  I ordered the St. Patty’s Day Massacre which was shaved corned beef, Swiss cheese, French fries, ancho-honey slaw, 1000 Island Dressing, Creole mustard on pumpernickle rye bread.  It was huge!! And I would have never thought of placing the home-made fries IN the sandwich.  I cannot remember what Steve ordered (probably something health!) but I was on holiday and not counting calories. Mine was delicious and since I wasn’t able to eat it all, the rest came home in a doggie bag to be savored at another time.

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That night Steve had marinated duck breasts to grill. Tucker made duck poppers by placing cream cheese and a bit of jalapeno pepper inside before wrapping the breast in bacon. Steve grilled them and talk about good!

I taught Max how to make a coconut cake. The cake was drenched in coconut milk and condensed milk and topped with Cool Whip and fresh coconut.

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I would give the Hemperley’s kitchen a five star rating!

For lunch the next day, Steve, Andrea and I went to Tracey’s Bar and Restaurant on the corner of Magazine and Third Street. It specializes in Po-boys, sandwiches, and fried seafood, and sides such as cheese fries, boudin balls, and fried okra, etc. It has been in business since 1949 and is dubbed The Original Irish Channel Bar.

Tracey's
From Tracey’s website

The ceiling is covered in New Orleans decorated umbrellas.  The World Cup Soccer final game was drawing a huge crowd who had come to watch on one of the 20 TVs that show nothing but sporting events.  We opted to finishing watching the game at home.

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On Monday, Tucker, Max and I had lunch at The American Sector Restaurant of the World War II Museum where Chef John Besh puts his twist on American cooking.

That night the family went out to Pascal’s Manale, a restaurant known as the “Home of the Original BBQ Shrimp”.  Located at 1838 Napoleon Avenue, it specializes in seafood, Italian dishes and steaks.

Pascal's Manale

From Pascal’s Manale Restaurant & Bar website

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Andrea and Max at Pascal’s Manale

Dinner began with an appetizer of oysters on the half-shell.  Some in the group ate steak, veal, or BBQ shrimp.  I opted for Chicken Bordelaise.  Max and I finished off dinner with a scrumptious bread pudding.

Andrea invited the boys and me to meet her for lunch at the Weston Hotel in Canal Place on Tuesday.  The River 127 located on the 11th floor has a spectacular view of the river with barges, paddle wheels, and other river traffic.  I had intended to make lots of pictures however as soon as we were seated a squall came through and the magic of the moment was gone!  Following a delicious lunch, Tucker, Max and I headed for the nearby Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium where we learned about the most ferocious diner in New Orleans…… the almighty Termite!!!

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Before heading home, we stopped on St. Charles Avenue for pralines.

That night we ate at Dat Dog on Foret where Emy works.  It is such a fun place, bright and colorful with any type of hotdog you can imagine.  None of which you would find in North Louisiana!

Freret-Dat-Dog

From Feret-Dat Dog website

Their menu is imaginative with vegan, spicy chipotle, turducken, duck, crawfish and alligator among other specialties.  The night we were there was Trivia night and the place was jumping!

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Max’s Alligator Dog

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Cheese Fries, anyone?

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Or something from the bar?

By Wednesday I was pooped and opted to stay home and rest.   Emy and Tucker told me that some of their fondest memories had been that of eating chicken and dumplings at my house when I lived in Covington.  I rested most of the day and then prepared a huge pot of chicken and dumplings with a salad for dinner.  It must have been good since there was none left.

The next night, Steve grilled venison burgers for a couple of Emy and Tucker’s friends and the rest of the family.  Needless to say it was another gastronomic delight.

Wow!  What a food binge I had been on!  If you would like an and epicurean experience such as this, then try New Orleans ‘cause dat’s the place to do it!

 

(For more information on any of these restaurants, check out their websites or Face Book page.)

Category: Road Trips, Stories | Tags:

ROAD TRIP: NEW ORLEANS IN JULY, PART 2: THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM

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When Steve and I began plans for my trip, he asked if there were things I wanted to do; places I wanted to re-visit; or explore for the first time.  My immediate reply was “The World War II Museum”.  Asking if he thought my grandsons, Tucker and Max, would want to go with me he said he wasn’t sure about Tucker, but that Tucker would be my assigned chauffer while I was visiting and could take me. He thought Max would love to go. Much to my surprise when I spoke with both boys they were eager to go with me!

Monday, July 14th the three of us set out in Tucker’s truck under threatening skies for the corner of Andrew Higgins Boulevard and Magazine Street where the museum is located.  After parking a few drops of rain began falling and I thought, it’s going to be another hot humid day in New Orleans and I, for one, was glad we were going to be inside! Plus, since it was a Monday and raining, there shouldn’t be too many tourists.

Across the street, there it stood!  Homage to all whose lives were lost or fought to insure freedom……… a repository of history, life’s tragedies, stories recorded, and items preserved so that the deadliest war in history would never be forgotten.

The museum, which was opened on June 6, 2000, consists of three buildings.  It is currently the most visited attraction in New Orleans.  The Liberation Pavilion is not open to the public at this time but will have three floors dedicated to the closing months of the war and the post war years.

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We briefly met Steve, who was having a business meeting at The American Sector Restaurant, a Chef John Besh restaurant where he puts his twist on American food. Steve greeted us and soon after left as his associates arrived. He looked dapper in his tan summer suit. Max commented he was the only one in the group not wearing a dark suit. Tucker said we would now get to see Steve working in “business mode” rather than his “Dad” role and laughed! This was going to be a fun day!

After a delicious meal we set off to explore the three buildings that comprise the museum and to purchase tickets for the museum and the movie Beyond All Boundaries. The movie would not start for another hour so we had time to explore the U. S. Freedom Pavilion/The Boeing Center and the Gift Shop.

The Boeing Center has displays of the B17, B25, B24, TBM Avenger, F4U Corsair, Mustang 51 and Sherman tanks. I am sorry to say that due to the number of visitors, taking good photos would have been difficult therefore some of the ones below are from www.wikipedia.com.

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Inside the Boeing Center

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From Wikipedia.com
640px-Sherman_Tank_at_WWII_Museum_in_New_Orleans
From Wikipedia.com

Crossing the street to the next exhibits we discover this German Air Raid Shelter which looks as if it would be too small for an average size person.

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From Wikipedia.com

Once inside, we discover veterans of World War II located at tables in intervals around the bottom floor eager to share their experiences and roles in the war. Stop and visit and they will enlighten you with photos, maps and their first hand knowledge of particular campaigns. There is also the Train Car Experience which depicts farewells and returns of soldiers and their families.

Upstairs is a maze and so much to see, not only from the United States but other countries as well. Rifles, handguns, uniforms, rations, tires, personal histories on tape, letters home, and so much more that I cannot even begin to share it all with you. In fact I can’t due to not being able to get into some areas for the other people there.

Soon it was time to enter The Solomon Victory Theater, home to Beyond All Boundaries, a 4 D movie narrated by Tom Hanks. I have to say that normally I do not like 3 D movies and was anxious about sitting through this one but I must add that it was the most spectacular thing I have experienced in many years! Of course the theater is total darkness and then goes through a multitude of exciting effects. The first loud bomb noise startled Max (who will soon be 13) out of his seat. In fact it did it several times! The gentlemen seated next to him asked if he was okay.

Lights flash, fog rolls in, and chairs begin to tremble at certain dramatic events during the movie. At one point a German Stalag guard house rises from the floor. In total darkness a search light canvasses the audience. Not a sound is heard other than a siren blasting. A gun turret emerges spitting out rounds and smoke in every direction. Your chair, which has had slight movement and coordinated with the actions being shown, begins to shake even more. I can only say it is a dramatic experience and Tom Hanks does a fabulous job in narration! But above all, it is a powerful documentation of the cost of freedom about over 400,000 soldiers who lost their lives that were Americans. Estimates of those who lost their lives in the war, from sickness related to the war, by the gas chambers, or who were civilians is believed to be at least 600 million!! Yes, that’s millions!

I had hoped there might be an opportunity to learn more about some of my fallen relatives or those who served in this terrible war. If the resources are there, I didn’t find them. However it you are interested in research on a family member who served in World War II, you will find this website helpful: http://www.nationalww2museum.org/honor/research-a-veteran.html.

For more information, I am including a map of The National WW II Museum below:

WW II Museum

Outside the storm had passed and the temperature and humidity had risen to intense extremes. My hair was instantaneous a mass of frizz. Suddenly I was aware of being in dire need of a snow ball!!!! And Tucker knew where we could find a snow ball stand not far from home.

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When Steve came home from work that day, each of us shared our experience. It was wonderful to hear these two boys tell their dad about our outing. Max ended by saying Steve was the only one not in a dark suit when he met his business associates at the restaurant. I couldn’t help but laugh! It was meaningful to have made a memory, a good laugh and shared it with Tucker and Max.

Who knew what tomorrow would bring? Wait! Didn’t I say that at the end of Road Trips: New Orleans in July, Part I? Ah, but you will soon know when I post Road Trips: New Orleans in July, Part III.

 

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