Category Archives: Genealogy

Throwback Thursday: A Day on the Cossatot

Don Hemperley and Tommy Burge

Don Hemperley and Tommy Burge after a morning of fly fishing on the Cossatot River near Gilham, Arkansas.

VIRGOS: HERE’S OUR SIGN!

According to astrology, Virgo, the sixth sign of the Zodiac, runs from August 23 through September 22 (although some say the cusp day is the 23).  It is the only sign represented by a woman.  Virgos typically are reliable, practical, meticulous and do well in vocations of service, such as doctors, nurses, teachers, bookkeepers.  They are also creative and sensitive.  Do I, as a Virgo, believe all of this?  I don’t put a lot of credence in it however I do read my horoscope daily!

In my family tree of most recent relatives, I have sixteen Virgos not counting myself.  My grandmother was one.  One aunt, one uncle, one daughter, one daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, one grandson, one great grandson, one niece and her husband, one nephew, one nephew’s wife, two great nephews, and one great niece are all Virgos. Whew!  Not to worry only four are the subjects of this post.

Granddaughter Emerson Avery Hemperley (Emy) was born September 3, 1992 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Steve and Andrea Tanet Hemperley.  As a child she took ballet but soon diverted her competitive spirit to sports playing tee ball and soccer.

Emy Hemperley

 

Emy, 1996

The photo above shows her determination while playing at an arcade in Celebration Station in New Orleans in 1996.

Emy began school in Mandeville, Louisiana; graduated from Sacred Heart Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Following graduation she traveled to Paris, France and has visited other large cities including New York City.   She attended Ole Miss, missed New Orleans, returned and is currently enrolled at the University of New Orleans.  She and her family enjoy spending time at their camp in Monterey, Louisiana however Emy is truly a New Orleans girl to the core!  She loves the city and all it has to offer; Mardi Gras, clubs, good food, family and friends.

Emy at Mardi Gras

Zachery Tucker Hemperley, Emy’s brother, was born September 6, 1994 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Tucker first attended school in Mandeville, Louisiana and graduated from Jesuit High School in New Orleans.  While living in Mandeville, he played tee ball and loved skate boarding.

Tucker Hemperley

Tucker likes to hunt and fish and can often be found at the family retreat entertaining friends.

Tucker's First Deer

Tucker’s first deer was taken in Monterey, Concordia Parish, Louisiana.  The following photo was made while fishing in Mexico.

Tucker fishing in Mexico

Tucker is in his second year at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge where he pledged K A.  Below is a photo of Tucker and Southern Belle, Gabby Ray at the fraternity’s celebration of the Old South.

 

Tucker and Gabby

Nine days following Emy’s birth, granddaughter Lauren Elise Brown was born in Hobbs, New Mexico on September 12, 1992 to Scott and Kelly Hemperley Brown.

Lauren was active in scouting beginning at the age of four.  Too young for the Daisys, she attended meetings where he mother was scout leader.

Lauren's first apron

She went on to become a Brownie, Girl Scout, and earned the Silver Star award which is the equivalent to the BSA Eagle Scout.

Lauren Elise Brown

She attended Herndon Magnet School in Gilliam, Louisiana and graduated from Caddo Magnet High School in Shreveport. Lauren enjoys Renaissance Festivals, Dr. Who, fly fishing and camping with family. They have traveled as far West as Colorado, North to South Dakota, and East to Florida and Washington, D. C. Lauren attended University of Louisiana Monroe and Louisiana Technical College in Shreveport where she studied the culinary arts. She is currently employed at a law firm in Shreveport.

the Dawsons

Lauren married Christopher Wayne Dawson and on August 23, 2014 gave birth to another Virgo, a son, Benjamin Rhys Dawson in Shreveport, Louisiana. Ben enjoys being fed, napping, and being spoiled by everyone.

Benjamin Rhys Dawson

And the final featured Virgo is my daughter, Kelly Anne Hemperley Brown. Kelly was born on September 21, 1963 in Texarkana, Arkansas. She was a mischievous child who was always into something. The joke in our family was that had she been born prior her brother, he would never have been born! There was always impishness in her eyes as she was about to get into something. However, to this day when she hears me call out “Kelly Anna”, she knows she’s in deep trouble! Give her a challenge and she will eagerly accept it.

Kelly Anne Hemperley

Kelly was educated in public schools in Vivian, Louisiana graduating from North Caddo High where she was a member of the Louisiana All Star Marching Band and the winner of the I Dare You award at graduation. She attended Louisiana State University-Shreveport for a short while before enrolling in business school. Prior to her graduation she was hired by the Caddo Parish Police Jury as personal secretary to the administrator; a position she held for seven years before moving to Hobbs, New Mexico. While employed at the Police Jury it changed to a Commission and a resolution was written into the Commission’s minutes, which was entered into Caddo Parish’s history, for her dedication and work during the transition.

Resolution of Appreciation for Kelly Hemperley Brown in Caddo Parish

 

In New Mexico she was employed by the City of Hobbs where she received special recognition as employee of the month.

Kelly Hemperley Brown, Hobbs, New Mexico

In 1993 her family moved back to Caddo Parish and she returned to work for Caddo Parish; this time in the District Attorney’s office in the drug division. Since then she has been responsible for the training of all secretaries in the District Attorney’s office and most recently moved to the position of secretary for the Appellate Court.

20140726_174724

Kelly’s dedication to helping others, lead her to become a Girl Scout leader for many years; church secretary; church youth leader; and exercise instructor. However I think she would say her most important job today is that of being wife, mother and grandmother. A job she does well!

Now that you have allowed me to give you a little insight to my favorite Virgos, I would also like to wish the others who share the sign a Happy Birthday. They are Andrea Tanet Hemperley, Marty Stanley Roberts and husband Jimmy, Damon Goodwin, Melissa Slaughter Goodwin, David Stanley, Greg Stanley, and Amanda Roberts Mather!

 

 

Throw Back Thursday: Jesse and Teeny’s Kids

Posted on by 0 comment

Jesses Kids Janet and Johnny

Janet Lynn Hemperley Stanley and Johnny Ray Hemperley, children of Jesse Raymond and Earnestine “Teeny” Jane Parker Hemperley.

JIMMY CLYDE STANLEY: JULY 30, 1933-MARCH 1, 2009

Posted on by 3 comments

Jimmy Clyde Stanley

Jimmy Clyde Stanley was born July 30, 1933 in Ida, Louisiana to Clyde Henry and Mamie Martin Stanley.  He was the first of six children and easily accepted the role of big brother to the rest of us.  He was a mover and a shaker before his time; meaning he was often the instigator of the antics of his two brothers and me (our two other sisters came along much later).  Mostly he was the one that was the most daring of the group, such as the time he wanted to be Captain Marvel.  He draped himself in one of Mother’s tablecloths to use as a cape, climbed the roof of our garage and bailed off thinking he could fly! Luckily the only thing broken was his pride and he lived to dream up some other new adventure.

Jim (also nicknamed Coot or Pete) attended school in Bivins, Texas prior to our moving to Atlanta, Texas.  In Bivins he was in a school play and in Atlanta he was an Atlanta Rabbit (football team) member.

Jim, High School

He first worked as a life guard at the Atlanta public swimming pool and later at Meyers’ Department Store.   His outgoing personality, smile, and the ability to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge was well suited for his occupation of sales or public relations with the exception of a few years he spent working in the oilfields in Odessa and Ganado, Texas.  While working in Odessa he received a good samaritan award from the Texas Highway Department for assisting someone in need.  Following that he served as district manager for American Built Homes in Texarkana, and Baton Rouge. Later in the Houston area he owned his own construction and remodeling business.

Jim’s first marriage was to Mildred Eva Howard of Texarkana.  They were married on November 21, 1952.  Prior to their divorce in January 1980 they became parents of Brenda Jane, Jimmy Lanier, Eva Carol and Scott Howard.  Eva Carol died at birth.

While he and Mildred, who had now changed her name to Toni, were living in the Nassau Bay, Texas area he learned to love boating.  Below are photos of a couple of his boats appropriately named the Phoni-Toni.

Jim's BoatPhoniToniII

In March of 1980 Jim remarried Patsy Jean Miller.  Jim’s new brother-in-law was an owner of Evangeline Downs in Opelousas, Louisiana and also owned an oil refinery in Venezuela.  He soon became general manager of the track and Commissioned Deputy Sheriff for Acadia Parish form 1988-1992.  He often traveled to Venezuela on business.

Jim Stanley's Acadia Parish Deputy Sheriff Commission

Jim Stanley's Passport

Jim married a third time to Denise Milsap and lived in Mobile, Mississippi for a while. No children were born of the second or third marriages.

He was a true Leo with a zest for life, warm spirit, confident, generous and loyal. He loved the finer things in life such as clothes, cars, boats and beautiful women. However a good joke or a heated game of Rook with his mother against other family members, were also indulgences he enjoyed. He was most generous with his parents and loved to take them out to dine or for a day on the bay in one of his boats.

The two greatest pleasures in his life were his children and grandchildren. He was giving, loving, and always there for them.

Jim passed away on March 1, 2009 of complications from Myasthenia Gravis and is buried in Vivian, Louisiana along- side his parents.

Happy Birthday, Brother! We still miss you!

Category: Genealogy, Stories | Tags:

THROW BACK THURSDAY: LINDA KAY “KITTY” STANLEY

Posted on by 3 comments

Kitty Stanley and Dale LeBlanc's Wedding

Today, June 19, 2014, marks the 38th anniversary of my sister Linda Kay (Kitty) Stanley and husband, E. Dale LeBlanc. They were married at St. Clement Catholic Church in Vivian, Louisiana.

The celebration began the day before when we dug a hole in my back yard to have a cochon de lait. It was a daunting task due to the fact that the backhoe digging the pit for the pig cut the gas line to my house. After repairing that, the cooking and celebration began. Many of Dale’s family and friends came from South Louisiana that night and celebrated with everyone. Then the rain began! And it rained all night. How would we ever get the pig roasted in time to feed all the guests by noon?

Family friend Betty Hall called early the day of the wedding to say she was making a novena. Sure enough the clouds disappeared, the rain stopped, the pig was thrown back in the pit and everyone ate at noon. Then the party began!

Following the 4:00 PM wedding all the guests returned to my house to continue the merrymaking. Some of Dale’s Cajun relatives sang Jolie Blonde and other songs in French. Others continued to eat. Many celebrated with libations. When the newlyweds left for their honeymoon, many lingered and the merriment lasted until midnight!

Category: Throw Back Thursday | Tags: ,

MILITARY MONDAY- 5th SGT. ANDREW SIMPSON HEMPERLEY, CONFEDERATE SOLDIER

Posted on by 0 comment

A S Hemperley tombstone

Andrew Simpson “Simpy” Hemperley was one of ten children born to Edward P. Hemperley and Malinda Foster in Georgia.  In the 1850 Census the family resided in the Twenty-ninth District of Fayette County, Georgia.  Edward P.  is listed as a farmer with real estate valued at $1,450.

On May 16, 1852 Andrew married Miss Louise Catherine Dodd in Fayette County, Georgia.  The marriage was performed by Louise’s father, John Sample Dodd, a prominent Baptist preacher.

A S Hemperley, Louise Dodd Marriage

Of this marriage there were four children born: Nancy M., Priscilla M., Sarah Levonia and Jefferson Beauregard Hemperley. From A History of Doddridge, Spring Bank, and the Other Communities of Sulphur Township Arkansas by Charles Wesley Bigby much is written about the Hemperley families that lived in the area.  What is known is that:  in 1856, prior to the Civil War Andrew and Louise moved to Bright Star, Arkansas.   In 1859 they had acquired eighty acres of land as proven by the deed below.

Andrew S Hemperley, BLM 1859

 

 

 

The following year they acquired an additional eighty acres.

Andrew S Hemperley, BLM 1860

In a letter written by Andrew’s son Beauregard he tells of how their home was built with logs and penned and keyed with no nails. It had a fireplace which was used not only for heating but also where Louise prepared all of their meals.

On March 3, 1862 Andrew enlisted in the 20th Arkansas Infantry, Company K in Lafayette County. His records show that he was a 5th Sergeant. By October the unit was engaged in fighting around Vicksburg, Mississippi. Records show that on the 4th of October 1862 he had been wounded and taken prisoner at Corinth, Mississippi.

 Page 5, A S Hemperley

In another document he was to be paroled and taken to Columbus, Kentucky from Corinth. However in the paroled section it lists “not stated”.

Page 8, A S Hemperley

From my research I have learned many of the healthier prisoners captured in that area were transported to prisons in other areas of the United States. Some of those infirmed were released to get home any way they could while others remained in hospitals. Since Andrew is buried in Vicksburg, I am lead to believe he was never sent to prison elsewhere.

In July 1862 Congress gave the President of the United States the right to purchase land for cemeteries “for soldiers who shall die in the service of their country.” It was also determined that Confederate soldiers and sailors were fighting in rebellion and would not be allowed to be buried in a Nation Cemetery. Therefore only Union soldiers and sailors are buried in the Vicksburg National Cemetery with the Confederates being buried in nearby Soldier’s Rest, a section of Cedar Hill Cemetery.

Below are some photos from the Vicksburg National Park.

20th AR Infantry at Vicksburg

Soldiers Rest CSA Cemetery, Vicksburg, MS

Arkansas State Memorial at Soldiers Rest

Sign at Soldiers Rest Cemetery

Also in the letter Beauregard wrote he tells of hard times following his father’s death. His mother fed them one winter on sweet potatoes; on Sunday mornings or when they had company she would make biscuits to go with them. She spun, corded and wove the cloth for their clothing, they ate game from the nearby woods, but she never returned to Georgia.

In writing this post I am thinking of our family’s Confederate hero but also of heroes lost in all the wars since Andrew’s death. I am also reminded of the unsung heroes, the wives who have kept families together at all cost, no matter their sacrifices. Perhaps it’s those ladies who deserve recognition, gold stars or a special hug.

 

THROW BACK THURSDAYS: MAMIE’S KIDS

Posted on by 1 comment

Mamie's Kids

A rare occasion when all six children are together for Mother’s Day, 1982.

Front row: Kookie Stanley Hemperley, Mamie Martin Stanley, Judy Stanley and Linda “Kitty” Stanley LeBlanc

Back row: Jimmy Clyde Stanley, Tommy Stanley and Charles Stanley

THROW BACK THURSDAYS: SOMETIMES IT’S BETTER NOT TO SHARE!

Posted on by 4 comments

Don, Steve and Kelly Hemperley 1969

Don, Steve and Kelly Hemperley, pictured in May 1969, on the day Kelly graduated from kindergarten. Little did we know she had the mumps!!! After her snuggling with Don, he too came down with them. We always taught our children that sharing was a good thing; this time it wasn’t! Kelly made a quick recovery however Don was very sick and we thought he was going to have to go into the hospital!

Category: Throw Back Thursday | Tags:

WEDNESDAY’S WOMAN: SYBOL LILLIAN O’PRY HEMPERLEY

Posted on by 1 comment

Sybol O'Pry HemperleyThe biblical verse from Matthew 5:5 says the meek shall inherit the earth and when I read this verse, I feel it perfectly applies my late mother-in-law, Sybol Lillian O’Pry Hemperley.  She was meek in nature, small in stature, unassuming, and not one to enjoy the lime light.  She was also a devoted wife, mother and Christian; today she is remembered as Wednesday’s Woman.

Sybol was born January 16, 1909 in Provencal, Louisiana to William Henry O’Pry and Amanda Salena Jones.  The O’Pry family consisted of Sybol and brothers, William Carl, Marshall Henry, Joseph Dowden (J. D.) and Leo Curtis.  In the 1910 census the family is located in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana where William Henry worked as a lumber grader at a planer mill, however, by 1920 they were located in Lafayette County, Arkansas where he was listed as a farmer. The family later moved to Caddo Parish, Louisiana in an area known as Pine Island, where William Henry sold Watkins products.

Sybol married John Raymond Hemperley on August 9, 1930.  Raymond had bought the marriage license in Arkansas however, at the time, they were living in Louisiana and Sybol wanted to be married in Louisiana.  How to resolve this problem?  They were married in the middle of the road where the two states join with one foot in each state!

While living in Gilliam, Louisiana they first lived on the “Ward Place” and later bought sixty acres just below there known as the “Cody Place” outside of Gilliam, Louisiana. Raymond’s parents, John Daniel Luther Hemperley and Laura Sara Jane Josephine Matilda Ann Hanson (thank goodness she went by Laura!) lived with them.  They had a shotgun house with Raymond and Sybol’s family on one side and John and Laura on the other. The family grew to include Sybol and Raymond’s three children, Jesse Raymond, Donald Ray and Mona Rose.

When the children were small, Laura kept the children while Sybol, Raymond and John worked the farm.  They raised cotton, hay for the cattle and a large garden.  They had chickens and hogs and when it was “hog killing weather”, the neighbors would come to help so the smoke house could be filled. The pantry was always filled with beautiful canned foods that line the walls and extra sugar, flour, etc. in the kitchen cabinets.  Since she had lived through the Great Depression, I believe she wanted to rest assured she could feed the family. Sybol wasn’t a fancy cook but liked cook books and was always clipping recipes from the newspaper or magazines.  I inherited one of her cookbooks, The Watkins Cook Book, pictured below.  You will note the copy write was in 1938 and that it cost $1.50.  I have no doubt she got it when her father was selling Watkins products. It is filled with some of her clippings which often have her hand written notes.

MeMaw's Cookbook

 

Typically Sybol wore fresh starched and ironed cotton dresses unless she was working in the garden where she wore long sleeves (no matter how hot the weather), a bonnet she had made, and gloves.

Sybol O'Pry Hemperley (MeMaw)

She loved flowers and her yard was full beautiful ones, particularly her favorites, daliahs and cleomes, also known as pens and needles.  She is pictured below with great grandsons, Brian, David and Greg Stanley by an iris bed.

Sybol Hemperley with great grandsons Brian, David and Greg Stanley

Sybol never gossiped, talk ill-will of anyone nor did I ever hear a profane word come from her mouth all the years I knew and loved her.

Sybol O'Pry Hemperley

Sybol Lillian O’Pry Hemperley at wedding of Kelly Hemperley Brown

Sybol never learned to drive and after Raymond’s death in 1970 the farm was sold and she moved to Gilliam.  She continued her gardening, attended church regularly at Linda Lay Baptist, and enjoyed her children and grandchildren.  She never had much, nor needed much.  She never asked for much; never wanted much other than visits with her family.  She was a simple, loving, giving, meek Christian woman. I have no doubt she “inherited the earth” but also a place in Heaven.

Sybol (who was lovingly called “Babe” by Raymond) passed away on January 10, 1986 in Vivian, Louisiana.  She is buried beside Raymond at Bathsaida Baptist Cemetery in Ida, Louisiana.

John Raymond and Sybol O'Pry Hemperley

MONDAY’S MAN: JOHN SAMPLE DODD

Posted on by 2 comments

John Sample Dodd, the son of Edward Neddie Dodd and Jane Langston, was born August 3, 1809 in Union, South Carolina. Jan Langston Dodd died and John’s father re- married Jane Word. John Sample Dodd married his step mother’s sister, Elizabeth Harriet Word.

John Sample and Elizabeth Harriet moved to Fayette County, Georgia in 1831 and traded a horse for a small farm. They cleared the land and built their home from logs. They farmed and raised eleven children, namely; James T., Elizabeth Harriet, Thomas E., Francis Marion, George McDuffy, Nancy Jane, Loudusky, Letitia (Lettie), John D., Sarah, and Asa Langston. Letitia married Edward Thomas Hemperley and her sister, Elizabeth Harriet, married Edward Thomas’ brother, Michael Cassell Hemperley.

John Sample’s wife, Elizabeth Harriet became a church member in 1830 and John Sample in 1932. She waited to be baptized at the same as he at the Bethsaida Baptist Church. John Sample’s biography is written in the Biographical Sketches of Prominent Baptist of Georgia as shown below:

Biographical Sketches of Prominent Baptists-John S. Dodd

 

Another article describing John Sample Dodd and some of his family’s contributions to his church and community is described in The Preaching Dodds of Old Campbell County below:

The Preaching Dodds of Old Campbell County, pg. 1

The Preaching Dodds of Old Campbell County, page 2

From these articles you will see that John Sample Dodd was a Baptist pastor licensed in 1841 who preached at Raman, near Palmetto for twenty-six years; Antioch in Fayette for twenty-one years, Bethlehem in Campbell for thirteen years and Fairburn for fifteen years. At times he served four churches at once having services on Saturdays and Sundays.

His son, Thomas Edward Dodd was not a preacher but was considered a spiritual leader that reared four sons that became pastors of Baptist churches.

Children of John Sample who served during the Civil War were, Asa L., a Sergeant, was killed at Cold Harbor, Virginia on June 1, 1864 serving with Lee’s Army. George M. was a 4th Sergeant who surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. Thomas Edward served three years in Virginia. John D. joined as a private, was sent to the hospital at Richmond, Virginia; sent home on sick leave and rejoined his unit at Charlotte, North Carolina. He was wounded at Bentonville, North Carolina and was in the hospital until the end of the war.

Following the Civil war, relatives of John Sample Dodd relocated from Georgia to the southwest corner of Arkansas and edge of Texas. In fact, the story goes that Doddridge, Arkansas was named for the Dodd family and because it sat on a ridge near the Sulphur River. Willis Henderson Dodd, John Sample’s half brother, and his wife Rachel Hemperley, moved to Bright Star, Arkansas where he was a successful farmer and physician. Jesse and his wife, Martha, moved a community they were instrumental in settling and named it Atlanta (Texas) for Atlanta, Georgia where she was raised. Loduska married David Evans and they cleared the first farm land and built the second house in Ida, Louisiana. Letitia married Edward Thomas Hemperley, a physician who practiced in both Louisiana and Arkansas. Their farm and home place was at Era, Arkansas. Letitia and Edward Thomas Hemperley are the great grandparents of my husband, Donald Ray Hemperley; John Sample Dodd is his great-great grandfather.

John Sample Dodd died February 2, 1892 and is buried at Bethsaida Cemetery in Forest Park, Georgia.

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: