Category Archives: Military Monday

Military Monday – Courage, Home & Fireside

Meet Corporal James Adams.

Corporal James C. Adams

Corporal James C. Adams

I found this photo in the belongings of my 2nd great-grandfather, Rev. Francis Hereford Williams.  I have been researching Rev. Williams trying to prove his service in the war between the states in order to get him a headstone.  Finding this picture was the first bit of evidence that led me to believe he was in the civil war.

Here is the back of the photo:

Corporal James Adams back of photo

Corporal James Adams back of photo

It says:

Corporal James Adams
Co. D. 1st Rgmt LA Vol
C.S.A.

Lost his leg at the battle of Malvern Hill, VA.  July 2nd, 1862 Sunday.  Thus another brave young man commenced the weary march through life with one limb, having freely given the other for

Courage, Home & Fireside
F.H.W.
A Comrade

I did a bit of research on Corp Adams, and found him to be in the Confederate Home in Austin, Texas at the same time as my 2nd great-grandfather, Rev. Williams.  I found no evidence that he lost his leg in that battle, there in no mention of it in his muster rolls.  That doesn’t mean anything though, as my Rev. Williams suffered a head wound and I have not found any of his muster rolls, nor any that list a Williams with a head wound.  They did mention that Corporal Adams had severe eyesight problems, which is verified by this picture if you look at his eyes.

The rooster for the Austin Confederate Home, does list his disability as loss of leg.

Conf Home Register Corp James Adams

Conf Home Register Corp James Adams

I don’t know how he lost his leg, but it’s evident he suffered.  I would love to know more about my 2nd great-grandfather’s friend.  It’s evident he thought highly of him!

Susie

Military Monday – Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. – My Uncle Son

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Today I would like to honor the memory of my great-uncle Sam H. Ball, Jr.  I’ve posted about my Uncle Son’s heroic time in WWII before and if you missed it click here to read more about him.

I was very privileged recently to visit with my cousin Karen Ball Cowan, Sam’s daughter and she graciously shared these photos with me and gave me permission to post them here.

Capt. Sam H. Ball enlisted in the Army on 31 May 1940.  He served until 5 Jan 1946 in Company “A” 146 th Engineer Combat Battalion when he was Honorably Discharged.  He remained in the inactive reserve until 16 Aug 1953.  He was also a member of the draft board.

After the war, Sam was a salesman for KTFS Radio Station in Texarkana for 35 years.

Please enjoy the pictures.

Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr.Officers from Company “A” 146th Engineers:

Officers of Company A 146th Engineers

Here is the back of this photo:

Officers of Company A 146th Engineers

The gentlemen in this photo are not identified, but I recognize Sam standing in the middle.

146th Engineer Combat Battalion Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr.

These are some postcards that he had:

Engineer Replacement Training Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA

Company Barracks, Ft. Belvoir, VA

Engineers constructing a heavy bridge, Ft. Belvoir, VA

Here is a picture of them constructing a bridge, I have no idea where this is.

Constructing a bridge 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Mess tent the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Mess tent the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Taking a rest - the146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Taking a rest – the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

WWII Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. others unknown

WWII Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. in the middle,  others unknown

In a bunker maybe?  - the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

In a bunker maybe? – the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

In a bunker maybe?  - the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

In a bunker maybe? – the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Sparing - the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Sparing – the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Marching - the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Marching – the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Tents of the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Tents of the 146th Engineer Combat Battalion WWII

Russian Lt. and Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. with pistols WWII

Russian Lt. and Capt. Sam H. Ball, Jr. with pistols WWII

Destruction. Vossenack, Germany.

Destruction in Vossenack,  Germany

Destruction in Vossenack, Germany

Destruction in Vossenack,  Germany

Destruction in Vossenack, Germany

Destruction in Vossenack,  Germany

Destruction in Vossenack, Germany

Wow! Is all I can say about these maps.

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

A Pictorial Map History of the 146 Engrs from June 6, 1944 to May 8, 1945

Liberation!! These are some postcards that he had:

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

Liberation WWII

More recognition for a job well done:

Maj Willard B Baker and Capt Sam H Ball Jr news article

Maj Willard B Baker and Capt Sam H Ball Jr news article

Maj Willard B Baker and Capt Sam H Ball Jr

Maj Willard B Baker and Capt Sam H Ball Jr

Reunions:

Normandy Reunion

Normandy Reunion

Omaha Reunion Lubbock Texas 1984 40th anniversary

Omaha Reunion Lubbock Texas 1984 40th anniversary

Omaha Reunion Lubbock Texas 1984

Omaha Reunion Lubbock Texas 1984

Omaha Beach Reunion article

Omaha Beach Reunion article

Remembering the War:

Remembering the War Sam Ball Jr

Remembering the War Sam Ball Jr

Sam Ball Jr Remembers Omaha Beach article 1988

Sam Ball Jr Remembers Omaha Beach article 1988

It’s overwhelming and humbling to look through his collections of photos from this time in his life and realize the magnitude of what he went through, and to know what a good man he was after the war.

If he ever had any problems that bothered him from his time in the war, I never heard him complain and neither did my grandmother, Mary Parks, his sister.  That’s just the kind of guy he was and I am so proud to have known him, if only I could have heard some of the stories!

Susie

Military Monday – Using Fold3.com

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Yes, I’m still here.  Barely though.  I’ve been fighting a case of the shingles and let’s just say that I haven’t felt like doing much of anything but scratching lately.

I’ll be doing several posts over the next few days to catch you all up on what’s been going on around here.  Also, my one year blog anniversary is coming up and you should really keep checking back because I will be doing a give-a-way to celebrate!

One thing I have been working on while being sick is getting my paperwork together to become a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Yes, I’m totally crazy to have taken on such a task while being sick, but honestly I have been working for two years to get the paperwork I needed and so the last month has just been about tying up loose ends.

Loose ends which Fold3.com enabled me to tie up from the comfort of my home so I didn’t have to spread the shingles out to the nice people at the History Commission.  I know they are grateful.  :)

For my Daughters of the American Revolution application, I have been working on documenting my lineage up to Thomas Bullard, my 5th great-grandfather, a private in Capt. Sharps Co. 10th Regiment, as I mentioned in this post here.  I was able to find all the documentation I needed about his role in the American Revolution on Fold3.com.

This is just one of the many pages of his service record, and pension files that they have on their website.

For my United Daughters of the Confederacy Application, I have been working on documenting my lineage up to Kennedy Wade Ball,  my 2nd great-grandfather, a Commissary Sgt. with the 11th Texas Cavalry who was wounded by a member of his own company on May 9th, 1862 in action near Farmington, Mississippi during the war between the states.

Oh, how do I know this??

Why, thanks for asking!  Fold3.com of course!

I found all his muster rolls, the casualty list of the wounded and dead from the action near Farmington, Mississippi and his wifes widow’s pension, all on Fold3.com

Here is the casualty report that lists him.  Totally never expected to find anything like this.

Page 2 Conf Casulty Reports Kennedy Wade Ball

By the way, I’m totally not affiliated with Fold3.com nor am I getting paid to make this post. I’m just totally happy about the fact that being at home sick, I was still able to obtain much-needed paperwork without leaving the house.

It’s a win/win situation for me and the people at the History Commission, right??

 

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Military Monday – Danny Gray

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I would like to share this video with you that my cousin Harry Short made about his cousin Danny Gray.

Harry and Danny grew up together in Fordyce, Arkansas.  Danny’s grandmother was Harry’s grandfather’s youngest sister.

Danny had many plans for his life, but he was drafted and went off to Vietnam.

He never came home.

This is his story….

A Heart Touched With Fire from Harry Short on Vimeo.

Thank you, Harry.  This is a very touching story and I’m very pleased to know the story behind Danny Gray, who is NOT just another name on the wall.

He’s a Hero.

P.S. – Hang on to your pants cause here I come!

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Imagine my grandmother’s excitement when she received this telegram from my grandfather!

My grandfather, William John (Bill) Parks was gone for three years during World War II. When my grandmother, Mary Ball Parks and my mother, Mary Helen Parks went to the train station to pick him up, they walked right by him. They didn’t recognize him, so he shouted out to them, and my mother was shocked when she saw him.  Normally a big man, he was skin and bones, and his teeth had rotted. His feet were in terrible condition but he was home and he was alive.

During the time he was gone, my mother and grandmother lived with my grandfather’s father, JT Parks.  He owned a three-story home, at 406 Walnut in downtown Texarkana and he also took in several women whose men were away during the war.

My mother has fond memories of this time, though marked with sadness at the absence of her father.  He kept in touch when he could and they were always glad to hear from him.

Mrs. W.J. Parks - Honey boy is it lonesome. I really miss you. Wish I were home. I love you = Bill.

Mrs. W.J. Parks - Dearest Darling. Darling I long for you so much there is not an hour of the day that goes by that I don't think of you. I miss you terrible and love you with all my heart = Bill..

There were also news reports:

One thing is certain though, they were sure glad to pick him up that day at the train station, and it was a day my mother will never forget.  Not even now with her Alzheimer’s.

This is me with my grandfather at Christmas in 1974.

He died just four years after this picture, in 1978.

You are gone but not forgotten Daddy O!  I love you and miss you terribly!

Susie

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